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Thursday, March 29, 2012

Friday Fun: Meet author Karen Michelle Nutt!

Please help me welcome the talented KAREN MICHELLE NUTT to the blog toay! Karen is a multi-published, award winning author, and whether you like historical, paranormal or time travel romance, Karen writes something for you!
You can find out more about Karen and her work at 
Karen's website.


Thanks for being here today, Karen:)



The Spring Equinox and Easter


Alban Eiler means ‘Light of the Earth.’  On March 20, it was the first day of spring where day and night were equal.  To the Celts, the equinoxes and the solstices were the holy times of transition, where nature and life cycles renew. 
The Spring Equinox is the mid-point of the waxing year.  The light born at the Winter Solstice has reached its maturity.  From this day on the days will grow longer than the nights.  This is the celebration of spring.  The Earth will be green and the crops will be planted.
The Spring Equinox is also called Alban Eilir, Eostar, Eostre or the Feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary. 
There is a distinct relationship between Spring Equinox and Easter.  The Catholic Church was good about absorbing the pagan traditions and their symbols and labeling the day with a new name.  The symbol of the egg for instance represents new life.  The church related it to Jesus in the tomb.  The egg looks dead but it still has the promise of life.  The colored eggs represent the colors of Easter Sunrise.
The spring equinox was celebrated before the Celtic tribes arrived in Ireland.  There are ancient Irish equinox temples in Knowth.  This is near Newgrange or ‘Brú na Boinne.’  Knowth has a 100 foot long passage that accepts the Sun on the morning of the Spring and the Autumn Equinox.  In Longhcrew, ‘Cairn’ is an older stone cairn equinox temple. 
In Ireland, Good Friday is a solemn day.  Most people fast until midday.  No one works or plays and if any eggs are laid on Good Friday, they are marked with a cross.  On Easter Sunday, they eat these eggs. 
Easter is a very sacred time of fasting and prayer.  At church on Easter Saturday, hundreds of candles are lit off the Paschal candle that has been blessed by the priest.  On Easter Sunday, a quiet meal of leek soup and roasted lamb may be eaten at home.
The priests would also bless and distribute the holy water.  Everyone would sprinkle their homes, the cattle for a special blessing and drink three sips of holy water for good health.

About the author: Karen Michelle Nutt resides in California with her husband, three fascinating children, and houseful of demanding pets. Jack, her Chihuahua/Yorkshire terrier is her writing buddy and sits long hours with her at the computer.
Her Book, Lost in the Mist of Time, was nominated for New Books Review Spotlight Best Fantasy Book of the Year Award 2006. A Twist of Fate was a nominee for Best Time Travel P.E.A.R.L. Award for 2008. Creighton Manor won Honorable Mention P.E.A.R.L. Award 2009.
Her new passion is creating book covers for Western Trail Blazers and Rebecca J. Vickery Publishing. In her spare time, she reviews books for PNR-Paranormal Romance Reviews.
Whether your reading fancy is paranormal, historical or time travel, all her stories capture the rich array of emotions that accompany the most fabulous human phenomena—falling in love.

Mr. O'Grady's Magic Box Blurb:
 Aubrey Jules, a reporter from Unbelievable Finds is sent to investigate a box, which is reputably older than time and crafted by the wee folks. Mr. O’Grady, owner of the bed and breakfast in Dana Point, California, convinces Aubrey to wish for a soul mate. When Ian Quinn, who abandoned Aubrey ten years ago, walks in she’s convinced the fairies have a wicked sense of humor.

Visit the author at: http://www.kmnbooks.com
Stop by her blog for Monday interviews, chats and contests at:


Traditions in Ireland for Easter day,
The butchers would have a mock funeral for the herring symbolizing the end of having to eat it. 
Go to church at sunrise to view the sun dancing with joy.
View the reflection of the sun in a pail of water and move it so the sun appears to dance.
Have a feast on Easter.  Kill a cow if you can.
Have a Cake Dance.  The best dancer receives the cake for the prize.  The Easter Cake Dance is called Pruthog.
Go to the Sunday’s well.  Have a bonfire.

Cáisc Shona Dhuit/Dhaoibh, Beannachtaí na Cásca oraibh go léir

13 comments:

  1. Jennifer,
    Thanks so much for having me here today!

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  2. Thanks, Karen! Comparative mythology is fascinating, and I love how it all ties together.

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  3. What an interesting post, Karen. I loved it. Any day I can learn something new is a good day.

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  4. I enjoy anything that speaaks of my Irish heritage. Happy Easter to you, too.

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  5. Fun post, Karen. I LOVE April and Easter! Happy Easter!

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  6. Jacquie,
    Thanks so much for coming by! I'm with you. I love learning about where our traditions originated.

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  7. Vonnie,

    I love learning new things, too. :) Thanks so much for coming by.

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  8. Vonnie, I love learning new things, too. Thanks so much for stopping by. :)

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  9. Loretta,

    A girl after my own heart. Love all things Irish!

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  10. Toni,

    Happy Easter and Spring to you!!

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  11. Thanks again for being here today, Karen! :)

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  12. Hi Karen, I'm a day late, but I wanted to stop by and say I really enjoyed your post. I too am fascinated with all things Irish and your post was really interesting. Your books sound fascinating. I'm looking forward to reading them. Thanks for hosting her Jennifer.
    Kelly
    Www.kellyabellbooks.com

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  13. Thanks, Kelly for coming by. I'm glad you enjoyed the post.

    Happy Spring!!

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